What Is A Kegerator/Keezer And What Equipment Do I Need To Build One?

Posted by Barley Beaver on

Kegerators

We have been asked 'what is a kegerator' and 'can I build one myself'? The answer is yes, you can build one yourself. Once you have selected your fridge or freezer we have the equipment you need to do this fun project. 

A kegerator or keezer is a special type of refrigerator or freezer that is designed to store and dispense beer from kegs. The components of a kegerator (depending on the type your choose) may include a stainless-steel keg, a CO2 cylinder, pressure regulator, keg coupler, beverage and gas lines, tower and taps, shank and drip tray. Simply put, it is a keg and a refrigerator combined. This is a great investment for many home brewers as it is a great way of keeping your beer carbonated and fresh for a long time.

While a kegerator is a great investment, they do not come cheap. In fact, a small yet decent kegerator/keezer can cost a few thousand dollars. So, if you don’t want to spend a lot of money, why not make one yourself?

When making a kegerator/keezer, you could use a low-end commercial fridge or you can use a spare refrigerator or freezer. You also need a conversion kit**, filled CO2 cylinder, screwdrivers, power drills, measuring tape, hacksaw, and a keg of your favourite beer or homebrew.

Before purchasing a new or used fridge, measure the interior of the fridge to make sure that the keg(s) will fit inside. Also, plan ahead and determine where you are going to place your keg(s), CO2 tank, regulator and tap. Most people install the tap on the side of the fridge away from the door, making it easy to replace the keg and/or CO2 tank without interfering with their beer lines. To install your tap simply drill a hole (usually 1") in the side of your fridge, insert your beer shank, then attach the faucet and beer line. If you plan of serving from more than 1 keg at a time from your new kegerator without having to continually change beer lines, you may drill additional holes and add more taps. When the taps are not in use you can remove the faucet and use a faucet plug to seal your shank.

If you are using a mini-fridge and plan to use the top as a mini bar, measure and mark where you are going to place your beer tower and drip tray .

Should you decide to keep your CO2 tank outside of the fridge you will have to drill a separate hole in order to pass the gas tubing through the fridge wall to connect to your keg.

Building your own keezer might be a difficult and challenging project but, you will be rewarded with a great way to dispense your kegged beer.

**While you could buy all the components separately, it is much less expensive to purchase a conversion kit with all the parts you need included. Some conversion kits come with the bare minimum, while others will have everything you need right from the CO2 tank to the dispensing tower.


Share this post



← Older Post Newer Post →


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published.